Just two more updates/items regarding Arid Uka, the Albanian from Kosovo who killed two American servicemen in Frankfurt in March:

Frankfurt shooter radicalized long before attack by Claudia Isabel Rittel, AP, Sept. 14

A man on trial for killing two U.S. airmen at Frankfurt Airport harbored anti-American feelings and spoke of violence about a year before the attacks, according to evidence presented at his trial Wednesday.

Arid Uka is charged with two counts of murder for the March 2 slayings of Senior Airman Nicholas J. Alden, 25, from South Carolina, and Airman 1st Class Zachary R. Cuddeback, 21, from Virginia.

The 21-year-old Kosovo Albanian also faces three counts of attempted murder for wounding two more airmen and taking aim at a third before his gun jammed.

In around a dozen pages of Internet chats collected by investigators, Uka talked at times about violence and criticized American patriotism…

On April 13, 2010, for example, Uka talked to fellow gamers about having “the Quran in the right hand and an AK-47 in the left,” according to one chat read aloud by Judge Christoph Koller.

In another message from October, he criticized U.S. reaction to the Sept. 11 attacks, saying “they have killed more people than any terrorist organization.” […]

In contrast, the U.S. killing thousands of people in the Balkans — in response to no attack or threat whatsoever — apparently did not bother Uka.

Killing in the service of Islam was OK, but as we can see the gratitude didn’t last too long.

In this next item, please note that out of the four attacks and would-be attacks cited in the second paragraph of this mainstream, Miami Herald report, two had Albanian planners:

‘Lone wolf’ terror seen as biggest threat by David Rising, AP, Sept. 4)

HAMBURG, Germany — After 9/11, it was the men who went to radicalized mosques or terror boot camps who were seen as the biggest terror threat. Today, that picture’s changed: Authorities are increasingly focusing on the lone wolf living next door, radicalized on the Internet - and plotting strikes in a vacuum.

The March fatal shooting of two American airmen in Frankfurt by a Kosovo Albanian. The bomb plot on Fort Hood, Texas, soldiers - possibly inspired by the 2009 shooting rampage on the Texas Army post. The foiled attack on Fort Dix, New Jersey, by a tiny cell of homegrown terrorists.

These Islamic terror plots share something in common with Anders Behring Breivik, the Norway killer who hated Muslims. They are the work of extremists who are confoundingly difficult to track because they hardly leave a trace.

In today’s transformed security landscape, authorities and experts say, the 9/11 plotters would surely have been caught…lone wolves or small homegrown cells that blend into the general population present a more slippery challenge.

“The ability to self-indoctrinate online is a big concern, because not being in a group complicates our task of surveillance,” he said. A terrorist group, he said, “is easier to monitor, moves around and has meetings.”

That’s what led to the first successful attack on German soil by an Islamic extremist, in which a 21-year-old Kosovo Albanian allegedly gunned down two American airmen outside the Frankfurt airport in March.

Arid Uka, a 21-year-old Kosovo Albanian who grew up in Frankfurt is accused of opening fire at the city’s airport on a busload of U.S. airmen on their way to Afghanistan, killing two and injuring two others.

According to the indictment, Uka was radicalized over time by jihadist propaganda he saw on the Internet, and the night before the act had watched a video that purported to show American atrocities in Afghanistan; it was actually a clip from a film. The investigation turned up no connections with any terrorist organization.

“He was a single person acting alone radicalized through jihadi Internet propaganda,” prosecutors’ spokesman Marcus Koehler told the AP at the time of the indictment. “That shows, in the opinion of the federal prosecutors office, how dangerous jihadist propaganda on the Internet is.”

In recent years, al-Qaida and other terrorist organizations have been increasingly targeting people like Uka - using radicals who grew up in Western countries to make videos in their native languages urging people in their home or adoptive countries to take up jihad.

…U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki’s sermons have turned up on the computers of nearly every homegrown terror suspect in the United States.

Al-Awlaki allegedly exchanged e-mails with the U.S. Army psychiatrist accused of carrying out the 2009 shootings at the Fort Hood military post in Texas. Prosecutors also say an al-Awlaki sermon on jihad was among the materials - including videos of beheadings - found on the computers of five men convicted in December of plotting attacks on the Fort Dix military base in New Jersey.

Last month, another U.S. serviceman was arrested for allegedly plotting to detonate bombs at restaurants frequented by soldiers in Killeen, Texas, next to Fort Hood…Pfc. Naser Abdo was caught only when a Texas gun shop clerk alerted authorities after finding the suspect acting strangely in his store.

In the 2007 Fort Dix case, wiretaps helped authorities find out about the deadly plot to attack the base. Suspects Mohamad Shnewer, Serdar Tatar, and brothers Dritan, Eljvir and Shain Duka, were convicted in December 2008 of conspiring to kill U.S. military personnel. […]