A Radio Free Europe internal report on Yugoslavia in 1978. It was not so long ago…

…On December 19 [1978] the Central Committee of the LCY held its second session in Belgrade under the chairmanship of Branko Mikulic. The major report was read by Dr. Vladimir Bakaric who…attacked “anti-Yugoslav [migrant] terrorists” being helped by “certain reactionary circles” in the West. Mikulic also delivered a speech which was then followed by a general debate during which the Kosovo leader Mahmut Bakalli discussed “a number of new and very harsh attacks on Yugoslavia by most responsible leaders of Albania” (Politika, 20 December 1978).

The United States. A high degree of official cordiality marked relations between the US and Yugoslavia in 1978, disturbed occasionally by the terroristic activities of the extremist Croatian exiles…In February, a US State Department report on human rights said that Yugoslavia’s citizens, unlike those in other East European countries, enjoyed “broad” freedom of movement and access to foreign publications and broadcasts…

President Carter gave an interview to the Belgrade daily Borba (March 5) in which he appraised American-Yugoslav relations as “very good” and stressed the joint efforts being made to improve them. He also said that “the nonaligned countries can play a very important role in world affairs” and emphasized that members of his administration “have often pointed out our support for Yugoslavia’s independence and territorial integrity, as well as its nonaligned role and its leadership in the nonalignment movement.” Zbigniew Brzezinski, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, said in his interview with Belgrade TV that…Washington attached “great importance” to the independence and nonalignment of Yugoslavia. When asked to comment on terrorist actions harming Yugoslav-American relations, Brzezinski called such acts “completely unacceptable” (Borba, 6 March 1978). In his official welcoming remarks on March 7, President Carter assured Tito that “the independence and the territorial integrity of Yugoslavia is one of the basic foundations of world peace now and in the future” (The New York Times, 8 March 1978).

In [a] joint statement issued on March 9, [the two presidents] also affirmed “that the right of all states to determine their own social systems without outside interference must be respected,” and that “nonalignment is a very significant factor in world affairs.” …In conclusion, they condemned any kind of terrorism and agreed that “effective measures must be taken to eliminate this senseless threat to people throughout the world,” especially “the violence directed against Yugoslavia.” President Carter “reiterated the continuing support of the United States for the independence, territorial integrity, and unity of Yugoslavia” (The New York Times, 10 March 1978).