I got the following letter last week:

Dear Julia,
…I was in Kosovo in 2012 for a period of 6 months with Italian Army (I’m Italian Reserve Officer) and I just can say that what I/we saw there is some kind of “science fiction”! My English is not so good to explain or to describe what I mean. An example, once I was talking with an Albanian man and he told me that all the Orthodox churches are Albanian, not Serbian, and that in reality the construction of the churches in Kosovo is Catholic style, not Orthodox (he wasn’t an architect or an arts expert!) Then, I realized what they want to do — to eliminate the spiritual, moral and historical relation of the Serbian population in Kosovo and Metohija with their tradition, religion, churches, everything. It’s terrible. […]

Indeed, we’ve visited that theme many time before — about de-Serbifying the ancient Serbian monasteries, with tourists being told “Kosovo monasteries” and “Kosovo” culture and “Kosovo” history where Serb things are concerned. (Though the more agenda-honest Albanian above does one better, skipping right over the “Kosovo” part and going straight to “Albanian,” Kosovo’s final destination.)

Relatedly, last month Nebojsa Malic emailed me a choice paragraph from Daniel Greenfield’s blog Sultan Knish:

Conquered peoples were expected to become Muslims. Those who resisted were repressed as Dhimmis. But those who submitted and became Muslims suffered a much worse fate, losing major portions of their traditions and history. They were expected to define themselves as Muslims first and look back to the great day when their conquerors subjugated them as the beginning of their history. Their pre-Islamic history faded into the mists of the ignorant past.

Nebojsa asked rhetorically, “Does this not fit two groups of Muslims we know?”

He’s referring, of course, to those “non-Muslimy” Albanians and Bosniaks, the latter a fictitious nationality made up mostly of Serbs whose families caved in generations ago.

To underscore the main point here, in reference to the lands that Albanians have had their eye on, that paragraph could easily read:

Conquered peoples were expected to become Albanian. Those who resisted were repressed as Dhimmis. But those who submitted and became Albanians suffered a much worse fate, losing major portions of their traditions and history. They were expected to define themselves as Albanians first and look back to the great day when their conquerors subjugated them as the beginning of their history. Their pre-Albanian history faded into the mists of the ignorant past.

And so we have Turks, Jews, Roma, Serbs and others in Kosovo who have “Albanized.”


Here NATO assists Kosovo’s remaining indigenous population and original religion to accept its second-class existence, as its traditions and history are repackaged. And the North Atlantic Council hopes the natives understand they need to be happy about this “bold” “progress” they’ve made in coming to terms with their fate in the hands of their conquerors, as they begin their Newborn Kosovo history.

(Worded otherwise: “The Secretary General [Anders Fogh Rasmussen] welcomed the landmark agreement on normalising relations between Belgrade and Pristina. ‘This is a very important step. I congratulate all those who helped to make it happen…The future of this region lies in moving forward…’ The Secretary General made clear that NATO and KFOR will continue to guarantee security in Kosovo and remain ready to deal with any attempts to undermine the progress that has been made…The Secretary General also led a visit of the North Atlantic Council to the Patriarchate of Pec…[and] repeated his commitment to the security of the monastery and its religious community, and stressed the progress achieved in the process of transfer of the guarding responsibility of special cultural and religious heritage sites in Kosovo.”)

“I hope the Serbian government will realize that the Serbs in Kosovo are treated with respect as a minority, and that it will in time help Kosovo separate.” — George W. Bush, 2008